Tag Archive: gear

Prescription Motorcycle Eyewear from ADS Sports Eyewear

What’s in the Box

If you’re anything like me and wear glasses while riding you know the limitations of standard prescription glasses in terms of both comfort and safety. Standard frames can be uncomfortable inside a helmet, can be hard to get on through a helmet, quickly become scratched, dirty and worn. I dislike riding with my everyday glasses for those reasons as well as limitations they place on my peripheral vision, which is critical to riding safely.

Thankfully the people at ADS Sports Eyewear have a line of eye wear for not only motorcyclists; but a wide range of activities. I’m on my 2nd pair of Wiley X glasses. Sadly, my first pair now rests at the bottom of the Lehigh River, lost during a kayak excursion (because I failed to use the strap included in the package). I missed those glasses immediately and couldn’t wait to replace them with something similar from ADS.

Fit

The Wiley X wrap style glasses contour to my face and tuck nicely into my helmet as though they were part of it. That’s important in riding since regular non-wrap style frames limit peripheral view. The Wiley X however, given the contour (the edge of the frame is closer to your face than standard glasses), enlarge your field of peripheral vision to be the maximum possible. The effect is similar to what a helmet with a wider eye port would allow.

My ADS frames are extremely light, flexible and stylish. The progressive lenses are perfect even though no doctor visit was done and no direct measurements performed.  ADS used my current prescription along with photos to create the lens shape that perfectly matched my physical features.

Technology

ADS makes use of the most important improvement in prescription sports eye wear: Free-form Digital Lens Surfacing (available on all but bifocal lenses). When traditional lenses are put in wrap style glasses there is a “fish-bowl” effect in peripheral vision. Free Form Digital Lens Surfacing eliminates this effect by digitally recalculating the curve at each point on the lens.

Customer Service

ADS works with each customer via email and regular mail to obtain measurements that ensure a perfect fit, even to the point of shipping a pair of frames (with return shipping pre-paid) so that a photo of the frames on your face can be used to make critical measurements for progressive lenses (which I opted for). As a motorcyclist who dislikes contact lenses I am more confident, safer and have much better vision on the road through the use of wrap style, prescription glasses from ADS Sports Eyewear. I highly recommend contacting them for your sports eye wear needs. With such name brands as Oakley, Ray Ban, Under Armour and Nike, to name just a few, ADS Sports Eyewear has frames in any tint, fit and prescription imaginable to suit any sports activity from motorcycling to skiing to baseball, shooting and racquet sports.

New Machining Marketplace

New Machining Marketplace Allows Cheaper Access to Custom Motorcycle Parts

Have you ever been customizing or restoring your motorcycle and been unable to source a part? This new online marketplace might be just what you are looking for.

Machining-4u is an online marketplace where motorcyclists can post their requirements for custom-machined parts, and receive multiple offers from machinists to select from. While the service is not specifically focused on motorcycle parts, it is particularly popular among motorcyclists.

The key advantage provided by Machining-4u is that it allows riders to source custom parts much cheaper than before. While you would previously have had to purchase parts from large, well-established companies, and pay a substantial premium, Machining-4u helps you to find much more reasonable prices. By increasing competition, the service takes power away from the large companies that dominate the industry.

Some examples of the custom-machined parts made by machinists at Machining-4u include bar ends, headlight brackets, wheel axle spacers, and braking adapters.

How It Works

A job is posted by uploading full information about the need, including blueprints and a description. Machinists can then start to submit their bids for the job. Once enough bids are in, the customer can take their pick based on various factors, including price, and the machinists’ experience and reputation on the site. When the customer selects a machinist, funds are stored in a secure account while the work is underway. Upon successful completion and approval of quality, the funds are released to the machinist.

How it started

Machining-4u was conceived when founders Simon Latour, Stephanie Brian and Stephane Gomez became frustrated with the availability and cost of custom-machined parts for cars, motorcycles and machinery. “Machining companies either rejected our requests as too small to bother with or quoted us ludicrous prices for such small production runs,” Stephane says. The solution? The innovative trio would set up a new online marketplace that would connect people directly with individual machinists. Since launch, Machining-4u has become increasingly popular as more and more motorcyclists are learning about the benefits provided by the service. With so many machinists ready and waiting to take on jobs, there’s no faster way for you to source affordable, custom machined parts.

The Head-to-Toe Beginner’s Guide to Motorcycle Gear

(CC0 License – Public Domain)

There’s a lot for new motorcycle riders to be excited about: learning how to ride, choosing a first motorcycle, and finally hitting the road and experiencing one’s surroundings as they can only be experienced from the back of a bike.

But as exciting as all of this is, it’s also serious business, and there’s more to getting started than just getting licensed and buying a new bike. Being properly outfitted in protective motorcycle gear is as crucial to motorcycle safety as proper training.

If you’re a beginning motorcyclist looking for some guidance on getting properly outfitted to ride, the following rundown should give you everything you need to get started finding the gear you need to ride in safety and comfort.

The Helmet

Helmets are undoubtedly the most important piece of safety gear any motorcyclist can wear. Even a minor fall off of a motorcycle can result in a serious head injury if the rider isn’t wearing a helmet, to say nothing of more serious accidents. Here are the basics of what to look for in a motorcycle helmet:

  • DOT Certification: The U.S. Department of Transportation has a specific standard for motorcycle helmets (the Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard no. 218), which outlines minimum performance ratings for metrics like impact absorption. Motorcycle helmets that meet this standard will feature a DOT sticker on the back or inside; don’t buy a helmet without this sticker.
  • Fit & Retention: A motorcycle helmet should fit snugly, but without being so tight that it’s uncomfortable. This will prevent the helmet from coming off or under-performing in an accident. Here’s a good basic test when finding a good fit: securely strap on the helmet and, gripping it from the back, try to pull it off over your head. With a helmet that fits properly, you won’t be able to.
  • Comfort: Discomfort is distracting, and no one wants to be distracted while they’re riding.
  • Style: Fashion should probably be the least of anyone’s concerns when shopping for a motorcycle helmet, but there are some choices when it comes to style. Full-face, open face, motocross, and half-helmets are all options. Full-face models offer the best protection, but many riders prefer open-face or half-helmets for comfort reasons.

The Jacket

What helmets do for your head, a good jacket does for your arms, shoulders, and torso. There are a lot of options when it comes to jackets, and it’s important to know what to look for.

  • Leather vs. Textile: A high-quality leather motorcycle jacket is about more than just looking cool. Leather offers excellent abrasion resistance, but might not be the best option for shock absorption. Many modern textile jackets are made from materials like Cordura or Kevlar, which also provide protection against abrasions, and are often a lot cooler than leather in warmer weather.
  • Armor: Armor and textile jackets are both available with built-in body armor to protect against falls. At minimum, look for a jacket with armor in the shoulders, back, and elbows with at least a “CE” safety rating.
  • Fit: A good motorcycle jacket should fit snugly without restricting movement. When trying on a motorcycle jacket, zip it up completely and try to approximate the position you take on your bike. If it’s too snug in the arms and shoulder to hold comfortably in the store, you can be it will be too snug on the road.

The Pants

Motorcycle pants protect your lower extremities from abrasions and impacts – shins, knees, hips, and bottom are all dependent on good motorcycle pants in a fall. Here are some of the most common options for motorcycle pants.

  • Leather: Leather pants, like jackets, offer superior abrasion resistance. However they’re often relatively uncomfortable, especially in warm weather. Most leather pants lack additional armor.
  • Textile: Textile riding pants are made with abrasion-resistant materials like Kevlar, and more often feature built-in-armor in high-impact areas like the knees and hips. As with jackets, these often feature better breathability than leather. Many manufacturers also make Kevlar and armor-reinforced denim jeans that strike a balance between style and safety.
  • Overpants: For commuters and others who don’t want to get to their destination with just armored riding pants, motorcycle over-pants are armored, abrasion-resistant pants designed to be worn over regular street clothes or denim motorcycle jeans.

The Boots

Footwear might not be as important for safety as a helmet or jacket, but it is a concern. Motorcycle boots provide protection to the ankle, shin, toes, and sole in the event of a crash, as well as offering improved grip and comfort on long rides when compared to normal street shoes. Here are some of the most common options for motorcycle boots.

  • Touring Boots: Touring boots are probably the most popular style of motorcycle boot. Generally tall to provide ankle support and shin protection, these boots are designed for commuting and long rides.
  • Short Boots: While not as protective in most cases as touring boots, short boots are often more comfortable, and offer a sneaker-like style and fit without completely sacrificing safety.
  • Cruiser Boots: Cruiser boots are heavy-duty boots designed for long rides on v-twin cruiser-style bikes. Heights vary, but typically cruiser boots offer great grip and superb protection against impacts and abrasions.

At the end of the day, the best motorcycle gear for you is what you’re most comfortable in – provided it offers at least a minimum amount of protection. Those just beginning will need some time to find out just what that is, but that’s all a part of the fun.

Weather On The Go

wbNow ScreenIf you’re anything like me you ride often, whether weekend day trips, daily commuting or extended multi-day trips. I commute in southeastern Pennsylvania throughout the year which means I ride in all types of weather, rain, occasionally snow, fog, high winds. Now on weekend rides or day trips that’s fine; but one thing I don’t do is commute in bad weather. My work occasionally involves being outside and I prefer not to have to deal with inclement weather on work days and the requisite clothing considerations that entails. With that in mind I’ve been using the WeatherBug weather app for a while now and with good results.

The widget on my Galaxy S5 (which I refer to often without ever needing to open the app) is unobtrusive and (more…)

Not Your Father’s WD40

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A new staple in my maintenance routine.

Who among us didn’t grow up seeing that yellow and blue can in the garage that came out whenever dad worked on the car or lawnmower? You may have heard the rumors that WD-40 was made gel lubricantfrom fish oil (it’s not) or that it’s not really a lubricant and shouldn’t be used on motorcycle chains… both are incorrect. “WD” in fact stands for “Water Displacement”, the 40 represents the 40th “recipe” of the original product. WD-40 has come a long way and I was surprised to here from them about (more…)

Helmet Halo

Helmet Halo logo

My helmet at YogaNext to the cost of the motorcycle itself your biggest riding expense is most likely your helmet. If you’re anything like me you don’t like putting your costly lid on the ground or any other surface apt to be dirty, hot, wet or sticky; unfortunately there are times when I have little choice. When I get to the office and the forecast calls for rain and it’s time to put the cover on I’m forced to put my helmet on the hot asphalt. In my cubicle at the office my choices are the floor under my desk or on my desk where I have precious little room. The Scala Rider attached to my helmet is also a concern due to its position on the chin bar. I’ve broken a few brackets when setting my helmet down in the past.

Halo StackHelmet Halo was designed to be a compact motorcycle helmet holder that eliminates these worries. Helmet Halo is made of tough plastic designed to stand up to abuse (trust me I’ve abused it in testing). Helmet Halo is inexpensive, portable, comes in four colors and can be coiled up for transporting. If I could wear it as a bracelet when not in use it’d be perfect; but even as is it’s pretty close.

(Note: Helmet Halo does not attach to a helmet in any way, it is merely a stand to hold a helmet upright.)

Please visit Helmet Halo to order.Helmet Halo

Viking 14 Large Tank Bag

Viking 14 Large Tank BagThe folks at Viking Bags sent us their Viking 14 Large Tank Bag a few weeks ago and after thoroughly testing it I can report that I’m quite impressed. If you ride as much as I do you know the value of a quality tank bag and the Viking 14 really fills the bill for both the commuter and serious touring rider. The Viking 14 (the 14 stands for its 14 liter capacity) is well made with Cordura stitching throughout. It features a sturdy carry handle, hefty zippers (which can be locked and are large enough to make access easy even with a gloved hand), all the pockets we’ve come to expect in a tank bag and of course a removable clear map sleeve.

The strength of the magnets in the base actually surprised me. I ride a V-Strom and you can see from the photo that the tank on a V-Strom isn’t smooth and flat but the Viking firmly grips the tank and hasn’t moved once in the dozen or so rides I’ve taken with it.

Here are some of the Viking 14’s features:

  • Heavy duty Cordura Construction.
  • Organizer included inside for Keys, wallets, cell phones etc.
  • Reflective piping for additional night time visibility
  • Easy to remove snap Pocket with zipper entry.
  • Duraflex® buckles throughout for added strength.
  • Flex Buckles throught the bag for extra strength.
  • Carry handle included.
  • Audio Slot.
  • Protective base.
  • Rain cover included.
  • Cell phone storage pocket.
  • Magnetic Base.

vikingbags-logoI won’t miss the need to loosen and tighten straps when gassing up and the Viking 14 stows away nicely in my top box to prevent theft (it also features lock loops if you prefer a strap to deter theft). At $61.99 the Viking 14 Large Tank Bag is competitively priced and, in this rider’s opinion, an excellent bag for the price.

Please check out the video below for more information and, as always, ride safe.

Alpinestars Ridge Waterproof Boot

Ridge_BootI had been a loyal wearer of Icon Super Duty boots for a few years now but I’ve recently decided to change styles. I’m currently wearing a pair of Alpinestars Ridge Waterproof touring boots. As a commuter the Super Duty worked well for me in that I could wear them all day at the office; however I am currently working from home and wanted a more substantial boot strictly for touring. The leather Alpinestars Ridge boot provides everything I was looking for at a reasonable price.

Styling

The Ridge boot is solid black with a reflective tab on the back of the heel for increased visibility (although a token increase – it’s a tiny patch). Stylish without being garish you can (more…)