Commuting

BigPantha Motorcycle Grip Lock

Motorcycle Grip Locks are a Premium Mid-Level Security Device for Motorbikes, Scooters and ATV’s!

What is a Grip Lock Anyway?

If the device seems unfamiliar to you, it’s the new type of motorcycle security device that everyone’s raving about—a motorcycle grip lock such as the BigPantha device. This device clamps onto the handlebar grips of your motorcycle, ATV, quad bike or even scooter, and immobilizes the vehicle by securing the throttle /or front brake.

It is often called a brake lock (because it can also lock the front brake), handle bar lock (considering it grips the handlebar), motorcycle clutch lock (when you use it on the left hand grip) and a throttle lock (since it secures the throttle and the front brake simultaneously).

With the significant increase in motorcycle theft each year (each costing roughly $15,000), securing your motorcycle against enthusiastic thieves is not really something to ponder over, but should ideally be on your checklist before even taking your motorbike on its maiden voyage. But the harsh truth is that most motorcycles are stolen because they are a cinch to get away with!

Here’s why the Grip Lock is a preferred choice for Motorcycle Owners looking for an Easy & Elegant Anti-Motorbike Theft Solution

One of the key features that makes a grip lock a hit in the motorcycle security space is that is a simple yet highly effective solution that won’t burn a hole in your pocket. In fact, the price of a high-end grip lock is less than $70—a truly small price to pay, where the BigPantha Grip Lock at the time of writing this piece rang in with a price tag of $38.95, and roughly $55 for its nearest rival—the – Green Motorcycle and Security lock by Grip-Lock.

And if you do your homework, you could most likely buy a grip lock at a discounted price or much less with a coupon. Either way, it is a negligible price to pay for a superior anti-theft solution.

What to Expect from a Grip Lock?

In all honesty, there is no single device that can offer full-proof protection for your motorcycle since a determined thief properly equipped (and with a bit of privacy) can probably do the unthinkable! So the big question you’re probably faced with is—what is the best level of security for your motorbike all things considered?

Just like Disc Locks, they are perhaps the best medium level motorcycle security devices you can get your hands on.

It goes without saying that if a couple of thieves pull up with a Hertz Van, your motorcycle – unless strapped with a very heavy chain & lock to an immovable object – is at risk. That’s a fact of life! However, installing a grip lock will at least prevent the motorbike from being rolled away or driven away until the grip lock has been removed. That’s going to require time, equipment and privacy!

Grip Lock – regardless of the type of vehicle be it a motorcycle, ATV or scooter, this device when properly fitted works the same across the spectrum. Just a quick note that, at present, it’ll fit on grips to 1.5 inches in diameter.

Side Note on Grip Locks for Mopeds and Scooters

Given that the rear brake is attached to the left handlebar some mopeds and scooters (and the front brake to the right grip), the grip lock in this case will either immobilize the rear brake or both the front brake and throttle.

Motorcycle Grip Locks available to you

Grip lock systems are a fairly household anti-theft accessory when it comes to protecting your prized possession (s), and for several good reasons, most notably affordability and efficiency. The benefits of employing the BigPantha motorcycle grip lock system are twofold—security and ability to efficiently secure your 2-wheeler in under 5 seconds flat.

Light and Compact Footprint

Introduced a few years ago, BigPantha has evolved as one of the most reputed names in the motorbike safety space, and their latest offering retains the same DNA. For starters, it boasts a solid design yet is surprisingly lightweight at just under 1lbs ad 5.5 x 2.4 x 1.1 inches, making it easy to haul around.

What’s there to Love about the BigPantha Grip Lock?

  • Tips the scales at a modest 1lbs
  • Made from lightweight yet robust aluminum
  • Measure the size of an average cell phone (excluding the Note 8 of course )
  • Can be purchased in either of two colors (more to come)—black and red
  • Tough, durable and tamper-proof
  • Package includes two laser cut keys
  • Universal design that fits all models of scooters, sports bikes and ATV’s, so there’s no guesswork on which model is the best fit
  • Heat, dust, water and rust resistant
  • Backed by a lifetime guarantee

Whether you own a small or big 2-wheeler, rest assured that the BigPantha motorcycle grip locking system is a fitting choice. This includes models from the Triumph, Harley, Suzuki, Ducati, BMW, Kawasaki and Yamaha stable.

Grip lock reviews testify that the key feature that sets the BigPantha grip lock apart from its competition is its sheer ability to secure your motorbike in just a few easy steps.

Using Your Grip Lock

  1. Start off by unlocking the grip lock with the included key. When done, the lock will open outwards similar to a crab claw.
  2. First thing you will notice with the lock in open position is that its claw is fitted with two grips—one smaller than the other.
  3. Place the open grip lock over the handle bar of your motorbike in a way that the first grip clamps onto the front brake or the clutch lever, and the second grip fits clings securely onto the handle or the throttle.
  4. Finally, lock the device using the included laser cut key.

How does it Stack up against the Competition?

The Green or Yellow Motorcycle and Security lock by Grip-Lock is another big name in this space as it is easy to use just like the BigPantha grip lock. But on the downside, it is made from plastic compared to the all-metal design of the BigPantha grip lock, so you can just imagine how easy it will be for thieves to snap it or cut it loose.

Is a Grip Lock Worth the Investment?

Before answering that question—ask yourself “what’s stopping you from buying a grip lock”? Just look at the bigger picture, where you’ve splurged on your motorcycle, so it only makes sense to add an essential layer of security for less than $100! Wouldn’t you agree?

This and myriad other grip lock reviews make it quite evident that the BigPantha grip lock sets the gold standard when it comes to buying the perfect grip lock owing to its universal design that fits pretty much any motorbike, ATV and even scooter. All in all, if you’re looking to save yourself the heartache of having your bike stolen and add to that the daunting task of filing insurance claims, the BigPantha grip lock is the accessory you need.

Check out the BigPantha Motorcycle Helmet Lock at Amazon and if you are interested then you can get a 20% discount using this Amazon Coupon Code (MCHLCK20).

Prescription Motorcycle Eyewear from ADS Sports Eyewear

What’s in the Box

If you’re anything like me and wear glasses while riding you know the limitations of standard prescription glasses in terms of both comfort and safety. Standard frames can be uncomfortable inside a helmet, can be hard to get on through a helmet, quickly become scratched, dirty and worn. I dislike riding with my everyday glasses for those reasons as well as limitations they place on my peripheral vision, which is critical to riding safely.

Thankfully the people at ADS Sports Eyewear have a line of eye wear for not only motorcyclists; but a wide range of activities. I’m on my 2nd pair of Wiley X glasses. Sadly, my first pair now rests at the bottom of the Lehigh River, lost during a kayak excursion (because I failed to use the strap included in the package). I missed those glasses immediately and couldn’t wait to replace them with something similar from ADS.

Fit

The Wiley X wrap style glasses contour to my face and tuck nicely into my helmet as though they were part of it. That’s important in riding since regular non-wrap style frames limit peripheral view. The Wiley X however, given the contour (the edge of the frame is closer to your face than standard glasses), enlarge your field of peripheral vision to be the maximum possible. The effect is similar to what a helmet with a wider eye port would allow.

My ADS frames are extremely light, flexible and stylish. The progressive lenses are perfect even though no doctor visit was done and no direct measurements performed.  ADS used my current prescription along with photos to create the lens shape that perfectly matched my physical features.

Technology

ADS makes use of the most important improvement in prescription sports eye wear: Free-form Digital Lens Surfacing (available on all but bifocal lenses). When traditional lenses are put in wrap style glasses there is a “fish-bowl” effect in peripheral vision. Free Form Digital Lens Surfacing eliminates this effect by digitally recalculating the curve at each point on the lens.

Customer Service

ADS works with each customer via email and regular mail to obtain measurements that ensure a perfect fit, even to the point of shipping a pair of frames (with return shipping pre-paid) so that a photo of the frames on your face can be used to make critical measurements for progressive lenses (which I opted for). As a motorcyclist who dislikes contact lenses I am more confident, safer and have much better vision on the road through the use of wrap style, prescription glasses from ADS Sports Eyewear. I highly recommend contacting them for your sports eye wear needs. With such name brands as Oakley, Ray Ban, Under Armour and Nike, to name just a few, ADS Sports Eyewear has frames in any tint, fit and prescription imaginable to suit any sports activity from motorcycling to skiing to baseball, shooting and racquet sports.

The Head-to-Toe Beginner’s Guide to Motorcycle Gear

(CC0 License – Public Domain)

There’s a lot for new motorcycle riders to be excited about: learning how to ride, choosing a first motorcycle, and finally hitting the road and experiencing one’s surroundings as they can only be experienced from the back of a bike.

But as exciting as all of this is, it’s also serious business, and there’s more to getting started than just getting licensed and buying a new bike. Being properly outfitted in protective motorcycle gear is as crucial to motorcycle safety as proper training.

If you’re a beginning motorcyclist looking for some guidance on getting properly outfitted to ride, the following rundown should give you everything you need to get started finding the gear you need to ride in safety and comfort.

The Helmet

Helmets are undoubtedly the most important piece of safety gear any motorcyclist can wear. Even a minor fall off of a motorcycle can result in a serious head injury if the rider isn’t wearing a helmet, to say nothing of more serious accidents. Here are the basics of what to look for in a motorcycle helmet:

  • DOT Certification: The U.S. Department of Transportation has a specific standard for motorcycle helmets (the Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard no. 218), which outlines minimum performance ratings for metrics like impact absorption. Motorcycle helmets that meet this standard will feature a DOT sticker on the back or inside; don’t buy a helmet without this sticker.
  • Fit & Retention: A motorcycle helmet should fit snugly, but without being so tight that it’s uncomfortable. This will prevent the helmet from coming off or under-performing in an accident. Here’s a good basic test when finding a good fit: securely strap on the helmet and, gripping it from the back, try to pull it off over your head. With a helmet that fits properly, you won’t be able to.
  • Comfort: Discomfort is distracting, and no one wants to be distracted while they’re riding.
  • Style: Fashion should probably be the least of anyone’s concerns when shopping for a motorcycle helmet, but there are some choices when it comes to style. Full-face, open face, motocross, and half-helmets are all options. Full-face models offer the best protection, but many riders prefer open-face or half-helmets for comfort reasons.

The Jacket

What helmets do for your head, a good jacket does for your arms, shoulders, and torso. There are a lot of options when it comes to jackets, and it’s important to know what to look for.

  • Leather vs. Textile: A high-quality leather motorcycle jacket is about more than just looking cool. Leather offers excellent abrasion resistance, but might not be the best option for shock absorption. Many modern textile jackets are made from materials like Cordura or Kevlar, which also provide protection against abrasions, and are often a lot cooler than leather in warmer weather.
  • Armor: Armor and textile jackets are both available with built-in body armor to protect against falls. At minimum, look for a jacket with armor in the shoulders, back, and elbows with at least a “CE” safety rating.
  • Fit: A good motorcycle jacket should fit snugly without restricting movement. When trying on a motorcycle jacket, zip it up completely and try to approximate the position you take on your bike. If it’s too snug in the arms and shoulder to hold comfortably in the store, you can be it will be too snug on the road.

The Pants

Motorcycle pants protect your lower extremities from abrasions and impacts – shins, knees, hips, and bottom are all dependent on good motorcycle pants in a fall. Here are some of the most common options for motorcycle pants.

  • Leather: Leather pants, like jackets, offer superior abrasion resistance. However they’re often relatively uncomfortable, especially in warm weather. Most leather pants lack additional armor.
  • Textile: Textile riding pants are made with abrasion-resistant materials like Kevlar, and more often feature built-in-armor in high-impact areas like the knees and hips. As with jackets, these often feature better breathability than leather. Many manufacturers also make Kevlar and armor-reinforced denim jeans that strike a balance between style and safety.
  • Overpants: For commuters and others who don’t want to get to their destination with just armored riding pants, motorcycle over-pants are armored, abrasion-resistant pants designed to be worn over regular street clothes or denim motorcycle jeans.

The Boots

Footwear might not be as important for safety as a helmet or jacket, but it is a concern. Motorcycle boots provide protection to the ankle, shin, toes, and sole in the event of a crash, as well as offering improved grip and comfort on long rides when compared to normal street shoes. Here are some of the most common options for motorcycle boots.

  • Touring Boots: Touring boots are probably the most popular style of motorcycle boot. Generally tall to provide ankle support and shin protection, these boots are designed for commuting and long rides.
  • Short Boots: While not as protective in most cases as touring boots, short boots are often more comfortable, and offer a sneaker-like style and fit without completely sacrificing safety.
  • Cruiser Boots: Cruiser boots are heavy-duty boots designed for long rides on v-twin cruiser-style bikes. Heights vary, but typically cruiser boots offer great grip and superb protection against impacts and abrasions.

At the end of the day, the best motorcycle gear for you is what you’re most comfortable in – provided it offers at least a minimum amount of protection. Those just beginning will need some time to find out just what that is, but that’s all a part of the fun.

Classic Cafe Racer Style

Classic Cafe Racers Have Rocking Style

There was this movement to have light bikes rebuilt with a low stance and high performance. I remember my first look at these stylish thoroughbreds. It was all good, and their gritty owners raced the streets on their dangerous-seeming bikes.

cafe11.http://www.acecafelondon.de/

What are these cafe racers?

The story began during the 1960s Britain. Bikers were stripping down and modifying (more…)

Helmet Halo

Helmet Halo logo

My helmet at YogaNext to the cost of the motorcycle itself your biggest riding expense is most likely your helmet. If you’re anything like me you don’t like putting your costly lid on the ground or any other surface apt to be dirty, hot, wet or sticky; unfortunately there are times when I have little choice. When I get to the office and the forecast calls for rain and it’s time to put the cover on I’m forced to put my helmet on the hot asphalt. In my cubicle at the office my choices are the floor under my desk or on my desk where I have precious little room. The Scala Rider attached to my helmet is also a concern due to its position on the chin bar. I’ve broken a few brackets when setting my helmet down in the past.

Halo StackHelmet Halo was designed to be a compact motorcycle helmet holder that eliminates these worries. Helmet Halo is made of tough plastic designed to stand up to abuse (trust me I’ve abused it in testing). Helmet Halo is inexpensive, portable, comes in four colors and can be coiled up for transporting. If I could wear it as a bracelet when not in use it’d be perfect; but even as is it’s pretty close.

(Note: Helmet Halo does not attach to a helmet in any way, it is merely a stand to hold a helmet upright.)

Please visit Helmet Halo to order.Helmet Halo

The Evolution of Motorcycle Safety

Did you know that the very first motorcycle was built in 1868? While popularity of the motorcycle didn’t quite catch on until the early 1900’s, it wasn’t until 1967 that the first helmet law was passed. Since 2005, not much has changed to enforce the law throughout the United States. In fact, according to this new info-graphic, it seems that motorcycle laws have become more lenient over the years. More and more states went from a universal helmet law to a partial helmet law by 2005, raising the age limit so that riders 20 and under (up from 17) are required to wear a helmet. This leniency has resulted in 17 states seeing an increase in motorcycle-related mortality rates.

Most states in the southeast and southwest saw higher mortality rates than the rest of the country. The most recent data from the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS) has determined that over 4,000 American motorcyclists died in traffic accidents during 2013, which is 13% of all motor vehicle deaths for that year. If the mortality rate for motorcyclists makes up more than ten percent of all accidents, why isn’t the law being adjusted to keep those motorcyclists safe?

The answer might lie in the mortality rates of the rest of the states. Click the graphic below to find out.

Motorcycle-Safety-IG-FINALmini1

Vikingcycle Skeid Brown Leather Jacket for Men

DSC_3653The folks at Viking Cycle sent over their Skeid Brown Leather Jacket for me to try. I have to say for the price this is a nice jacket. I’m about 6 feet tall and 180 pounds and the large size fits me perfectly. I have long arms and there is ample material to keep my wrists covered while riding. The material is sturdy and thick and gives me confidence in the event of a fall. The styling will appeal to cruiser enthusiasts. Constructed of Buffalo hide this jacket has everything a 3 season rider might need including:

  • Antique brass zips.xray
  • An outstanding feature of this jacket is multiple pockets that allow you carry all your accessories in organized manner such as phone, sunglasses, I pad, knife, cell phone, keys, wallet and documents. 
  • 2 layers of lining, quick zip out liner backed with mesh lining. 
  • Approved protection at shoulder and elbow , adjusted and fitted to hold the desired places . 
  • Elasticized panels at front ,back and bottom to provide the movement and comfort you need. 
  • Full ventilation, Air vents in each arm to provide ventilation Two front chest dual zipper compartments; button down flap. 
  • Ergonomic design to provide the compactness , now comes in lighter weight not bulky as some conventional jackets feel. safety
  • Zippered sleeves for gloves
  • Mandarin collar airtight collar and zippered cuff for adjustability

With regard to fit the jacket fits like a motorcycle jacket should, snug and comfortable. The color is an extremely dark brown, which I like. The price is hard to beat listed at just $99.99. You would have a hard time finding similar quality for the price.

Ride safe.

 

All Who Wander

WandersmallThe article “All Who Wander” by Bud Miller was originally published on the “RoadRUNNER Motorcycle Touring & Travel” magazine website on 5/26/2012.

“Not all who wander are lost.” – J. R. R. Tolkien. Lately it seems like every day is busier than the last. I’ve started making lists first thing in the morning to remind me of what I intend to accomplish, in order of priority, for the day. Last Wednesday my list was a long one. In addition to some work I had to wrap up, I also had yard work to do, a book outline to finish, patent forms to fill out, a doctor appointment to keep, a new camera to get familiar with for an upcoming tour, a review for my other blog, and this post to write.

There’s never enough time to get everything done and often precious little time to ride, but it was 85 degrees and brilliant outside so I decided to get done what I could and then mount up and take Big Red to my appointment. On the ride home I started thinking again about all I had to get back to as I baked in traffic; but at some point I just began to enjoy the ride and everything else seemed to fade in importance. I happened upon a road I had passed a thousand times on my commute but had never ventured down before and, on a whim, decided to see where it would take me.

The road led me along a stream at low elevation and I could feel the air temperature change in the shade near the water while the flickering sun stabbed down at me through what seemed like every possible shade of green in the canopy above. A cool breeze through my jacket took the place of the oppressive heat of the day; the traffic was replaced by a private stretch of twisting asphalt that I had all to myself. The chores of the day were somehow gone and forgotten as my mind was filled by the wonder and euphoria of what lay around the next bend as the road narrowed and turned to gravel. I started to think: all that stuff can wait, this feeling is too important to ignore and I went from living in an immediate future of busyness to a state of being completely present and conscious only of the cool air, the tank between my knees, the sound of the engine, and the sensory pleasure of a stunningly colorful day.

Sometimes getting nothing done is more of an achievement and has more value than does checking items off of a to-do list. We do what we must so we can have moments like these. It’s so easy to get caught up in work, in the other stuff of life, and to forget to let joy in. It can be hard to remind yourself to wander and harder still to allow yourself to; but it’s important, necessary in fact. Ralph Waldo Emerson said, “Nothing can bring you peace but yourself.” Peace can come simply by seeing what lies down a new road, what you find there is of little or no importance, the joy is in the seeking. However long my list, I’m pretty sure next week will feature more wandering, even if I don’t get lost.