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BigPantha Motorcycle Grip Lock

Motorcycle Grip Locks are a Premium Mid-Level Security Device for Motorbikes, Scooters and ATV’s!

What is a Grip Lock Anyway?

If the device seems unfamiliar to you, it’s the new type of motorcycle security device that everyone’s raving about—a motorcycle grip lock such as the BigPantha device. This device clamps onto the handlebar grips of your motorcycle, ATV, quad bike or even scooter, and immobilizes the vehicle by securing the throttle /or front brake.

It is often called a brake lock (because it can also lock the front brake), handle bar lock (considering it grips the handlebar), motorcycle clutch lock (when you use it on the left hand grip) and a throttle lock (since it secures the throttle and the front brake simultaneously).

With the significant increase in motorcycle theft each year (each costing roughly $15,000), securing your motorcycle against enthusiastic thieves is not really something to ponder over, but should ideally be on your checklist before even taking your motorbike on its maiden voyage. But the harsh truth is that most motorcycles are stolen because they are a cinch to get away with!

Here’s why the Grip Lock is a preferred choice for Motorcycle Owners looking for an Easy & Elegant Anti-Motorbike Theft Solution

One of the key features that makes a grip lock a hit in the motorcycle security space is that is a simple yet highly effective solution that won’t burn a hole in your pocket. In fact, the price of a high-end grip lock is less than $70—a truly small price to pay, where the BigPantha Grip Lock at the time of writing this piece rang in with a price tag of $38.95, and roughly $55 for its nearest rival—the – Green Motorcycle and Security lock by Grip-Lock.

And if you do your homework, you could most likely buy a grip lock at a discounted price or much less with a coupon. Either way, it is a negligible price to pay for a superior anti-theft solution.

What to Expect from a Grip Lock?

In all honesty, there is no single device that can offer full-proof protection for your motorcycle since a determined thief properly equipped (and with a bit of privacy) can probably do the unthinkable! So the big question you’re probably faced with is—what is the best level of security for your motorbike all things considered?

Just like Disc Locks, they are perhaps the best medium level motorcycle security devices you can get your hands on.

It goes without saying that if a couple of thieves pull up with a Hertz Van, your motorcycle – unless strapped with a very heavy chain & lock to an immovable object – is at risk. That’s a fact of life! However, installing a grip lock will at least prevent the motorbike from being rolled away or driven away until the grip lock has been removed. That’s going to require time, equipment and privacy!

Grip Lock – regardless of the type of vehicle be it a motorcycle, ATV or scooter, this device when properly fitted works the same across the spectrum. Just a quick note that, at present, it’ll fit on grips to 1.5 inches in diameter.

Side Note on Grip Locks for Mopeds and Scooters

Given that the rear brake is attached to the left handlebar some mopeds and scooters (and the front brake to the right grip), the grip lock in this case will either immobilize the rear brake or both the front brake and throttle.

Motorcycle Grip Locks available to you

Grip lock systems are a fairly household anti-theft accessory when it comes to protecting your prized possession (s), and for several good reasons, most notably affordability and efficiency. The benefits of employing the BigPantha motorcycle grip lock system are twofold—security and ability to efficiently secure your 2-wheeler in under 5 seconds flat.

Light and Compact Footprint

Introduced a few years ago, BigPantha has evolved as one of the most reputed names in the motorbike safety space, and their latest offering retains the same DNA. For starters, it boasts a solid design yet is surprisingly lightweight at just under 1lbs ad 5.5 x 2.4 x 1.1 inches, making it easy to haul around.

What’s there to Love about the BigPantha Grip Lock?

  • Tips the scales at a modest 1lbs
  • Made from lightweight yet robust aluminum
  • Measure the size of an average cell phone (excluding the Note 8 of course )
  • Can be purchased in either of two colors (more to come)—black and red
  • Tough, durable and tamper-proof
  • Package includes two laser cut keys
  • Universal design that fits all models of scooters, sports bikes and ATV’s, so there’s no guesswork on which model is the best fit
  • Heat, dust, water and rust resistant
  • Backed by a lifetime guarantee

Whether you own a small or big 2-wheeler, rest assured that the BigPantha motorcycle grip locking system is a fitting choice. This includes models from the Triumph, Harley, Suzuki, Ducati, BMW, Kawasaki and Yamaha stable.

Grip lock reviews testify that the key feature that sets the BigPantha grip lock apart from its competition is its sheer ability to secure your motorbike in just a few easy steps.

Using Your Grip Lock

  1. Start off by unlocking the grip lock with the included key. When done, the lock will open outwards similar to a crab claw.
  2. First thing you will notice with the lock in open position is that its claw is fitted with two grips—one smaller than the other.
  3. Place the open grip lock over the handle bar of your motorbike in a way that the first grip clamps onto the front brake or the clutch lever, and the second grip fits clings securely onto the handle or the throttle.
  4. Finally, lock the device using the included laser cut key.

How does it Stack up against the Competition?

The Green or Yellow Motorcycle and Security lock by Grip-Lock is another big name in this space as it is easy to use just like the BigPantha grip lock. But on the downside, it is made from plastic compared to the all-metal design of the BigPantha grip lock, so you can just imagine how easy it will be for thieves to snap it or cut it loose.

Is a Grip Lock Worth the Investment?

Before answering that question—ask yourself “what’s stopping you from buying a grip lock”? Just look at the bigger picture, where you’ve splurged on your motorcycle, so it only makes sense to add an essential layer of security for less than $100! Wouldn’t you agree?

This and myriad other grip lock reviews make it quite evident that the BigPantha grip lock sets the gold standard when it comes to buying the perfect grip lock owing to its universal design that fits pretty much any motorbike, ATV and even scooter. All in all, if you’re looking to save yourself the heartache of having your bike stolen and add to that the daunting task of filing insurance claims, the BigPantha grip lock is the accessory you need.

Check out the BigPantha Motorcycle Helmet Lock at Amazon and if you are interested then you can get a 20% discount using this Amazon Coupon Code (MCHLCK20).

The Road Not Yet Traveled

The article “The Road Not Yet Traveled” by Bud Miller/Zen Motorcyclist was originally published on the “RoadRUNNER Motorcycle Touring & Travel” magazine website on 7/31/17.

Two roads diverged in a wood, and I—
I took the one less traveled by,
And that has made all the difference.”  -The Road Not Taken” by Robert Frost

 

When I started blogging for RoadRUNNER five years ago or so, I used the title “The Road Often Traveled” for my first few posts. Commuting by motorcycle was what I thought I knew something about, so I borrowed and butchered a line from Robert Frost’s 100-year-old poem. I often heard it referred to as “The Road Less Traveled,” but the title is actually “The Road Not Taken.”

I recently had a phone conversation with the head of marketing for a sports eyewear manufacturer. It turned out to be an unexpectedly in-depth conversation not only about how I started riding but also writing, as well as my professional career path. It got me thinking about the Frost poem and about how decision leads to decision and one path leads to another. After a bit of research, however, the poem has come to mean something new to me.

You’ve no doubt heard the phrase “the road less traveled” used to sell everything from cars to vacations, to self-help books. You’ve seen it inscribed on mugs and on inspirational posters. While Frost’s poem is easily one of the most searched pieces of literature ever written, it is also one that is almost always misinterpreted.

The poem speaks of a traveler coming upon two roads diverging in a yellow wood. In most cases (car commercials, for instance), the words are used as a celebration of rugged individualism and people boldly choosing the path that not many do; but the poem isn’t about that at all. Rather, it’s about reconciling our decisions later in life, looking back and coming to terms with our choices long after they’ve been made. As the poem says, both roads are equally worn and there is no difference between them—a fact many eager to push product always miss.

Frost initially wrote the poem to poke fun at his friend, English critic Edward Thomas, who had the habit of regretting whatever path the two happened to take during their walks in the countryside. After coming across this fact about the poem, I felt better about it. I had always thought the poem somewhat sad, since the narrator says he would speak of his choice of direction many years later with a sigh. I’d always thought that sigh meant that he’d lament having not chosen the other road, that, given the chance, he’d want to go back to see how things might have turned out had he chosen otherwise.

As a motorcyclist, I can point to the specific events that prompted me to start riding, of choosing that “road.” I’ve written about them often in the last few years. In the broader sense though, I’ve given thought to the other “roads” I’ve taken in life. Recently my friend and coworker Brian asked if I’d ever thought about what career path I might have chosen if I hadn’t pursued computer-aided design. As is the case with my decision to start riding, I couldn’t help but smile and say, “No, actually, I am where I’m supposed to be.”

The decision to begin riding motorcycles was the most natural I’ve ever made. I needed my brother’s company after our father’s death. To look back with a sigh and imagine having not decided to ride isn’t a question at all—never was, never will be. Truth be told, I can’t think of a path I’ve been down that I’ve regretted or would choose not to go down again. You are the sum total of the roads you’ve traveled, and if you love yourself (and you must) then you must love those roads, those choices that made you who you are. Rather than an arbitrary choice to be re-examined with a sigh years hence, I’ll look back on riding, as I do now, as a liberating decision that expanded my circle of friends and created a vehicle of expression for feelings that might otherwise have gone unexpressed.

Riding itself can be seen metaphorically as “the path less traveled,” and, my friends, it certainly has made all the difference. When I hear advertisers get Frost’s poem wrong, I have to laugh. More than 100 years later he’s still having fun with us while at the same time making us think.

Wherever you find yourself on your road, I hope that you are looking ahead to your next choices and content with those already made. After all, that road, your road, really is the road not yet traveled.

Prescription Motorcycle Eyewear from ADS Sports Eyewear

What’s in the Box

If you’re anything like me and wear glasses while riding you know the limitations of standard prescription glasses in terms of both comfort and safety. Standard frames can be uncomfortable inside a helmet, can be hard to get on through a helmet, quickly become scratched, dirty and worn. I dislike riding with my everyday glasses for those reasons as well as limitations they place on my peripheral vision, which is critical to riding safely.

Thankfully the people at ADS Sports Eyewear have a line of eye wear for not only motorcyclists; but a wide range of activities. I’m on my 2nd pair of Wiley X glasses. Sadly, my first pair now rests at the bottom of the Lehigh River, lost during a kayak excursion (because I failed to use the strap included in the package). I missed those glasses immediately and couldn’t wait to replace them with something similar from ADS.

Fit

The Wiley X wrap style glasses contour to my face and tuck nicely into my helmet as though they were part of it. That’s important in riding since regular non-wrap style frames limit peripheral view. The Wiley X however, given the contour (the edge of the frame is closer to your face than standard glasses), enlarge your field of peripheral vision to be the maximum possible. The effect is similar to what a helmet with a wider eye port would allow.

My ADS frames are extremely light, flexible and stylish. The progressive lenses are perfect even though no doctor visit was done and no direct measurements performed.  ADS used my current prescription along with photos to create the lens shape that perfectly matched my physical features.

Technology

ADS makes use of the most important improvement in prescription sports eye wear: Free-form Digital Lens Surfacing (available on all but bifocal lenses). When traditional lenses are put in wrap style glasses there is a “fish-bowl” effect in peripheral vision. Free Form Digital Lens Surfacing eliminates this effect by digitally recalculating the curve at each point on the lens.

Customer Service

ADS works with each customer via email and regular mail to obtain measurements that ensure a perfect fit, even to the point of shipping a pair of frames (with return shipping pre-paid) so that a photo of the frames on your face can be used to make critical measurements for progressive lenses (which I opted for). As a motorcyclist who dislikes contact lenses I am more confident, safer and have much better vision on the road through the use of wrap style, prescription glasses from ADS Sports Eyewear. I highly recommend contacting them for your sports eye wear needs. With such name brands as Oakley, Ray Ban, Under Armour and Nike, to name just a few, ADS Sports Eyewear has frames in any tint, fit and prescription imaginable to suit any sports activity from motorcycling to skiing to baseball, shooting and racquet sports.

More Alike

The article “More Alike” by Bud Miller/Zen Motorcyclist was originally published on the “RoadRUNNER Motorcycle Touring & Travel” magazine website on 3/27/17.

“We are more alike, my friends, than we are unalike.” —”Human Family” by Maya Angelou

There are times when the deadline to finish this chronicle sneaks up on me. I am by nature a procrastinator and work better under pressure. As it happens, I’m writing this one from a hospital waiting room as my mother undergoes a biopsy. She’s been in remission for 16 years now but her doctor recently discovered a mass that has us all concerned. I, of course, rode the motorcycle here.

My mother has been an example to me that being kind and compassionate is more important than being right. She, more than any other person in my life, is the reason I am so concerned with riding safely; so that the woman who taught me love and kindness never need hear that I’ve been injured. I have no interest whatsoever in causing her pain.

I’ve taken a bit of a step back from social media of late and feel relieved to have done so. Kindness, at least online, seems to have taken a back seat to contention, argument, judgment, and sadly, the reposting of fake news. It’s something I see and hear little of among the motorcycle community, at least those I ride and trade emails with. The previous RoadRUNNER Touring Weekend was completely devoid of that kind of tension, even in the midst of a politically polarized year. Motorcyclists usually leave such things at home and simply enjoy each other’s company.

We tend to lean toward the good, toward positivity and open-mindedness. Whether that is true of all motorcyclists or just true of those I call friends is of little consequence. The important and lasting thing is that the vehicle itself, and its transformative nature, seems to promote positivity rather than the negativity it can be so easy to fall victim to. When in each other’s company, we discuss our children, our spouses or significant others, our travels, our trials, our griefs, and joys, and not our political or religious affiliations or our resentments and social grievances.

So, as I sit here and wait to talk to my mother’s doctor, the silliness of carrying around angst of any kind seems to melt away much as it does when riding. My only concern today, right now, is smiling toward and sharing a kind word with others in the waiting room. Sometimes hardness hides hurt; sometimes we’re just so guarded we need the other person to smile first, and I kind of like being that person.

I have a friend, Quinn, who I’ve seen disarm complete strangers with kind compliments and a wide smile. It’s funny how such small gestures can lighten someone’s load and bring them joy. I’ve seen her do it on several occasions. That Quinn is 10 years old serves as a lesson to me that our perceived differences are learned; we aren’t born with them. We could all stand to be a bit more like her, a bit more concerned with smiles and seeing commonality than in identifying difference.

I’ve always disliked labels; they are an all too easy way to define someone, and too often we allow them to stop us from connecting with others. Everyone has a mother and no one wants to sit where I’m sitting now, having just sent her, fearful and fragile, to undergo a procedure with such hateful potential. As sons and daughters, mothers and fathers, we all share the desire for our loved ones to be home, healthy and happy. As motorcyclists, we just want to share the road and the experience with each other. We’re lucky—we have the bike as a commonality. I can’t help but think though that it shouldn’t take a sport to connect with people whom we may not otherwise agree with ideologically. Maya Angelou’s “Human Family” says what motorcyclists, in my experience, feel and exhibit innately. “We are more alike, my friends, than we are unalike.”

When I see mom in recovery I’m going to read it to her. She’ll love it, because she lives it, and is the kindest person I will ever know. Ride safe, my friends.

 

MCrider Training Videos episode 3

How To Be Smooth On Your Motorcycle

My friend Kevin Morris at Ridergroups.com has produced a series of quality training videos every rider should see. It’s all too easy to convince yourself that you’ve ridden enough to be completely competent and believe that you need no further instruction. However, all of us, no matter our level of experience can benefit from the videos Kevin has produced. I urge you to take a look. I learn something new from every episode and I’m sure you will too. Here is episode #3.

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New Machining Marketplace

New Machining Marketplace Allows Cheaper Access to Custom Motorcycle Parts

Have you ever been customizing or restoring your motorcycle and been unable to source a part? This new online marketplace might be just what you are looking for.

Machining-4u is an online marketplace where motorcyclists can post their requirements for custom-machined parts, and receive multiple offers from machinists to select from. While the service is not specifically focused on motorcycle parts, it is particularly popular among motorcyclists.

The key advantage provided by Machining-4u is that it allows riders to source custom parts much cheaper than before. While you would previously have had to purchase parts from large, well-established companies, and pay a substantial premium, Machining-4u helps you to find much more reasonable prices. By increasing competition, the service takes power away from the large companies that dominate the industry.

Some examples of the custom-machined parts made by machinists at Machining-4u include bar ends, headlight brackets, wheel axle spacers, and braking adapters.

How It Works

A job is posted by uploading full information about the need, including blueprints and a description. Machinists can then start to submit their bids for the job. Once enough bids are in, the customer can take their pick based on various factors, including price, and the machinists’ experience and reputation on the site. When the customer selects a machinist, funds are stored in a secure account while the work is underway. Upon successful completion and approval of quality, the funds are released to the machinist.

How it started

Machining-4u was conceived when founders Simon Latour, Stephanie Brian and Stephane Gomez became frustrated with the availability and cost of custom-machined parts for cars, motorcycles and machinery. “Machining companies either rejected our requests as too small to bother with or quoted us ludicrous prices for such small production runs,” Stephane says. The solution? The innovative trio would set up a new online marketplace that would connect people directly with individual machinists. Since launch, Machining-4u has become increasingly popular as more and more motorcyclists are learning about the benefits provided by the service. With so many machinists ready and waiting to take on jobs, there’s no faster way for you to source affordable, custom machined parts.

MCrider Training Videos episode 2

Can You See Me Now?

My friend Kevin Morris at Ridergroups.com has produced a series of quality training videos every rider should see. It’s all too easy to convince yourself that you’ve ridden enough to be completely competent and believe that you need no further instruction. However, all of us, no matter our level of experience can benefit from the videos Kevin has produced. I urge you to take a look. I learn something new from every episode and I’m sure you will too. Here is episode #2.

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MCrider Training Videos episode 1

My friend Kevin Morris at Ridergroups.com has produced a series of quality training videos every rider should see. It’s all too easy to convince yourself that you’ve ridden enough to be completely competent and believe that you need no further instruction. However, all of us, no matter our level of experience can benefit from the videos Kevin has produced. I urge you to take a look. I learn something new from every episode and I’m sure you will too. Here is episode #1.

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